Tag Archives: training

Orion 10: Summer 2014

Reading to Orion 1 Reading to Orion 2 Reading to Orion 3

I discovered Orion loves being read to – well, who doesn’t?

Vanessa Bee had to go abroad for a week, teaching horse agility, so she lent me the equipment she’d brought to our farm. The plan was that on her return she’d collect it and see how we’d progressed. My homework was to do anything I could think of to make Orion less nervous and more trusting, and to get him moving more freely.

(Everyone has different ideas about using titbits as a training tool – some people have strong ideas on the subject! I’ve found that too many titbits can make horses pushy and bad tempered, but they’re useful occasionally. I only give treats as a reward when a horse has done something really good, and I try to give them in a bucket rather than by hand. When I was out walking with Orion I sometimes pulled some grass for him to eat. Chewing seemed to help him relax. I saved treats like pieces of apple for the end of a training session or when he was very good.)

Orion came in every day but went out in the field at night with Tempo and Croix de Guerre.
Orion came in every day but went out in the field at night with Tempo and Croix de Guerre.

This is what I did with Orion in the days after Vanessa left:

I sat in the barn with him a read him some books. He really enjoyed that, and stood as close as possible. If he could have sat on my lap to look at the book with me, I think he would have! I was with him but not concentrating on him, he was free to come and go as he pleased and I wasn’t expecting anything of him. His attitude towards me started to change from wary to accepting. (There are photos at the top of the page.)

At Vanessa’s suggestion, I left safe obstacles like the tarpaulin, hoops and cones in with Orion. This gave him a chance to explore them by himself. He particularly liked playing with the cones, and carried them between his teeth to rearrange them!

Orion guarding his cone arrangement
Orion guarding his cone arrangement

One of my attempts to allow him to explore a new thing had unintended consequences. I bought a large yellow flag with a smiley face on it, and draped it over the gate so he could investigate it. Horses often explore new objects with their mouths, and unfortunately that’s just what Orion did. He picked the corner of the flag up with his teeth and pulled back in alarm when it slid off the gate. As I’ve mentioned in other blogs, he clamps his jaw tight when he’s nervous or frightened, so the flag stayed firmly between his teeth as he bolted around the barn with the flag flapping all around him – sometimes over his head so he couldn’t see anything. I held my breath, waiting for him to crash into something or try to jump the barriers, but after several laps he slowed to a trot, then a walk, and stopped. I think he’d worked out fairly quickly that if he slowed down the flag didn’t flap so much. Eventually his jaw relaxed and the flag sank limply onto the straw. Orion nudged it, pawed at it and then walked away looking embarrassed. He didn’t mind flags after that. (I never left him alone with flags, as he could have hurt himself on the poles.)

Orion showed a definite preference for the Union flag
Orion showed a definite preference for the Union flag
DSCF6309
Boo! Boo!

Friends often visit the farm, so I tried to introduce as many different people as possible to Orion.

Orion and his good friend Flora
Orion and his good friend Flora
My friend Kath leading Orion through the curtain
My friend Kath Constant leading Orion through the curtain

Soon I was taking Orion for walks away from the farmyard. Every time we went a little further.

Walkies!
Walkies!
Returning from a walk around the fields
Returning from a walk around the fields

Things were going well. Vanessa was impressed with the progress we’d made when she came to collect her equipment.

I began to take Orion for walks around the fields, and he was very good. It was still difficult to get him to walk consistently with his head in line with my shoulder, but he was getting better at it. A few times he shied slightly at things, but I always managed to calm him down and he seemed to enjoy our adventures. As he became more confident so did I – too confident, perhaps.

We’ve got a large, long field called Cow Field. Silage had been harvested from it in July, and now there was a fine crop of after-grass in it, so I walked around the edge rather than through the middle. We were walking along by the top hedge when a pheasant flew up from its hiding place in the long grass with a flurry of wings. I must admit it made me jump. Orion bolted for the centre of the field. For a second I managed to check him when he reached the end of the rope, he pulled me for a few steps and then I could hold on no longer. He galloped around the field, his head high in alarm, while I looked on helplessly, cursing myself for not hanging on. He refused to be caught, so I had to go back to the farm and ask Chris to bring Tempo up to the field to acts a decoy. So much for not trampling the grass!

I went to bed that night filled with self-doubt. I really should have held on to that rope somehow! I wondered whether all the time I’d spent with Orion had been worth it. Would I ever be able to get him calm and trusting enough to take to shows? (Not that I’m into showing, but I wanted to do something with him.) Perhaps I should just let him run free on the moor with the other geldings…